WALLETECTOMY

 

When I was a kid food was different.  We didn’t have much packaged food.  We were 6 in my family so meals had to be affordable.  My Mom mostly made soups and stews or meat and vegetables.  We were rarely allowed sugary foods – only on birthdays. That included soda.  My Mom had a craving for salt so she would order Charles Chips by the container and sometimes their pretzels. (But those were mostly for her and she kept them hidden for special treats.)  Fruit was our snack.  Nobody in our family was overweight.  Thank you Mom!

Recently (the last decade) I’ve had the amazing opportunity to study lifestyle genetics.  I find I have all the carb sensitivity gene mutations (proven with clinical studies) and many of the fat sensitivity gene mutations.  I have blood sugar mutations.  I have a profile that would set me up to be overweight if all of those genes expressed but because my Mom had us on a low glycemic eating program, they did not express.

When I went to college I went “hog wild” and ate packaged crumb cakes, cookies, all kinds of carbs and drank soda.  No surprise I gained 25 pounds.  I managed to lose it all by taking up racquetball and for 30 years I maintained my weight with exercise.

Last year my Mom died. She had just turned 88 and had blocked arteries. Her first symptom was extreme pain. She was told she had shingles. I suggested she have a stress test.  They found the blockages.

She was recommended open heart surgery.  I work with many kinds of health professionals.  Not one of them thought that was a good idea.  If she did not have the surgery she would die.  But we (the health professionals and myself) all felt if she did have the surgery, she would not recover and the end would be beyond miserable.  My siblings encouraged her to have the surgery, I believe out of their own desire to keep her alive but also because the hospital MDs said she could make it.  They likely knew she could not survive this surgery.  They also most likely knew what her end would be like.

So why would they do that?

That is what my best friend calls a “walletectomy.”  I don’t blame MDs.  They have to follow hospital protocols or they can get sued.

So why is it the hospital protocol?

That brings us to the United States medical system.  You can’t avoid politics if you are talking about health.  The U.S is the only western country that doesn’t take care of its citizens’ health.  Right now they want to downgrade the little care they do offer.  Why?  Because the current administration values the support of business more than they value the quality of life of their citizens regardless of the spin they constantly put out.  And BTW, the alternative to truth is falsehood.

But, I digress….

After my Mom’s surgery she told me she was being “blamed” for not trying to do the exercises and recovery routines they recommended.  During this time her organs were all struggling to recover.

I’m pretty sure my Mom continued her low glycemic style of eating most of her life but I learned eventually she was an alcoholic – the secret kind.  It’s always a clue when someone BRINGS alcohol with them to visit you.  Just in case…

The point of my story is I BELIEVE in low glycemic lifestyle. Alcohol is not part of it. Alcohol will make you fat and it will contribute to heart disease.  It also puts you at a higher risk for cancer.

Once in a while is a good rule for most things.  I have a glass of red wine maybe 3 times per year and I can only drink about an inch of it because I have liver detox mutations and a whole glass will give me a hangover. Yuk.  What is once in a while for you?

I’d suggest once/week.

If you can’t do that, I’d suggest you ask yourself why.

I’m a super enthusiastic proponent of the TLS system for weight management and healthy cardiovascular system.  I highly recommend you watch this video and then do the quiz.  Does it cost money?  Yes.  Is it worth it?  YES YES YES!!!!  I will personally help you to be accountable on a daily basis, no fee.  This will be the last program you will every need to get fit. I’ll add one caveat – IF YOU ARE READY to stop yo yo-ing.

It would be my pleasure to speak to you.

If you are a health professional who would like to be the health leader you know you can be, implement epigenetics, weight management, prevention, etc. ….

It would be my pleasure to offer a complementary proposal and the support you deserve.

Kathy@criticalhealth.org, 617.515.7559.

Below is more information on cardiovascular support and weight management for the science minded, clinically trained.  This infographic is also for women. Women can commit domestic violence, assault, be aggressive, etc.

An article by Dr. David Brownstein, (MD),03/18/17 about using cholesterol to diagnose heart disease

In an on-line article in The New York Times today (3.17.17), the headline states, “Cholesterol-Slashing Drug Can Protect High-Risk Heart Patients, Study Finds.”  The article describes the first test of the new cholesterol-lowering medication—Repatha.  Repatha is part of the PCSK9 inhibiter family that works by lowering LDL-cholesterol levels through poisoning an enzyme—PCSK9–thereby allowing LDL receptors to remain in circulation.  LDL receptors can bind LDL-cholesterol, thus more LDL receptors will result in lowered LDL-cholesterol levels.

 

I have written about PCSK9 inhibitors before.  In my book, The Statin Disaster, I wrote, “I do not think PCSK9 inhibitors will be an effective treatment for heart disease as it will disrupt a normal physiologic process in the body: the binding of LDL to its receptor.” (1) So, let’s look at the first study which was published in the New England Journal of Medicine, March 17, 2017. This was a randomized, double-blind, placebo controlled trial involving 27,564 subjects with heart disease and LDL-cholesterol of 70 mg/dl or higher who were receiving statin therapy.

The primary endpoint was the composite of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction, stroke, hospitalization for unstable angina, or coronary revascularization.  Keep in mind that hospitalization for angina and coronary revascularization (i.e., coronary artery bypass graft surgery or stent placement) are considered soft endpoints since the decision to hospitalize or place a stent is a subjective decision by the physician.  The ultimate success of any cardiac medication should be based on hard endpoints such as death, heart attacks, or stroke.

After 48 weeks of Repatha therapy or placebo, the authors reported that, compared to placebo, the Repatha group significantly reduced the risk of the primary end point by 15% (9.8% in the treatment group vs. 11.3% in the placebo group.)  However, as I have pointed out to you before, the 15% reduction is actually a relative risk reduction.  The relative risk is a statistical term that has no meaning when considering whether to recommend or not recommend a therapy to a patient.  A more accurate assessment is the absolute risk difference.  In this case, the absolute risk difference between the two groups is 1.5%.  A more accurate description of the results should state: as compared to placebo, taking Repatha for two years’ results in a 1.5% decline in a combination of outcomes including death, stroke, myocardial infarction, hospitalization for angina and coronary revascularization.  Another way to look at the data is that the drug failed 98.5% who took it as they received no benefit.  And, if you take out the soft endpoints, the 1.5% decline disappears.

I called Specialty Pharmacy to find out how much Repatha costs.  I was told Repatha costs $2,351.05 per month for a total of $28,212.60/year). So, a two-year course of the medication costs $56,425.20.  (Note; The NYT article states the drug costs $14,523 per year.)

For the physicians, out there, I have a question for you:  Who the heck would prescribe an expensive drug, associated with serious adverse effects, that fails 98.5% who take it?

For the patients, out there I have a question for you:  Who the heck would spend $28,212.60/year for a drug that is associated serious side effects and fails 98.5% who take it?  In this study 25% of those that received Repatha reported serious adverse effects.     What were the serious adverse effects?  I don’t know—they weren’t listed individually.

Repatha is another example about what is wrong with conventional medicine. President Trump just released his first budget.  I would advise him to start tweeting about the failure of Repatha and why it should not be allowed in the market place.  There are far too many ineffective, expensive drugs right now.  We don’t need another one.  Statins are a great example of ineffective drugs that fail nearly 99% who take them.  Now we can add PCSK9 inhibitors to the pile of poorly-performing drugs.

More information about cholesterol lowering medications can be found in my book, The Statin Disaster.

Repatha for heart disease?  Fugetaboutit!

The Triglyceride/HDL Cholesterol Ratio. What Is Ideal?

Many studies have found that the triglyceride/HDL cholesterol ratio (TG/HDL-C ratio) correlates strongly with the incidence and extent of coronary artery disease. This relationship is true both for men and women.

One study found that a TG/HDL-C ratio above 4 was the most powerful independent predictor of developing coronary artery disease.

With the increasing prevalence of overweight, obesity, and the metabolic syndrome this ratio may become even more important because high TG and low HDL-C is often associated with these disorders.

The TG/HDL-C ratio can easily be calculated from the standard lipid profile. Just divide your TG by your HDL-C.

However, when looking at the ideal ratio, you have to check if your lipid values are provided in mg/dl like in the US or mmol/L like in Australia, Canada, and most European countries.

If lipid values are expressed as mg/dl (like in the US);

TG/HDL-C ratio less than 2 is ideal

TG/HDL-C ratio above 4 is too high

TG/HDL-C ratio above 6 is much too high

If you live outside the US or are using mmol/L, you have to multiply this ratio by 0.4366 to attain the correct reference values. You can also multiply your ratio by 2.3 and use the reference values above.

If lipid values are expressed as mmol/L (like in Australia, Canada, and Europe);

TG/HDL-C ratio less than 0.87 is ideal

TG/HDL-C ratio above 1.74 is too high

TG/HDL-C ratio above 2.62 is much too high

My lifestyle genetics

My good friend Nancy Miller-Ilhi, PhD

NIH clinical study LeptiCore